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Welcome on our online source for a variety of Inverter Type Mini Split Air Conditioners and Diesel, Propan Power Generators. When you buy from us you are buying from a company that has great experience in customer service, satisfaction and supply. We pride ourselves on our service and our products;



Visit our Showroom:

 
2245 Rue Guenette
Ville Saint-Laurent
(Montreal) QC.
H4R 2E9 Canada
 
sales@quebecsales.com


Welcome to the Knowledge Center! Here you can find all  the information you would require about our split air conditioners.

Consist of two parts; The out door unit( Compressor) and the indoor unit (Evaporator). The two units are connected together by means of two insulated copper tubing (The Line set) and the wires which provide power from the out door to the indoor unit. One power supply to the compressor will feed the whole system.

Air conditioners and most other split air conditioning systems tend to supply a thermostat as well as a silent blower fan which assists in spreading the air through the premises in a rather efficient manner.
Mini split air conditioners have a number of superior advantages over other standard systems such as window air conditioners and portable air conditioners. If you are thinking about getting a new air conditioning system installed in your home or office, you should consider air conditioning. You will be surprised at the various benefits which it brings into your life.

If your house or office does not have any ducting, that is no reason to remain without an air conditioner. Split air conditioners provide  you with a level of comfort of a central unit at a fraction of the price and will go a very long way in improving your lifestyle.

Inverter Technology

Digital Inverter technology maintains precise control of room temperature and creates a comfortable environment.

In conventional split Air Conditioners, the compressor switches off once the set temperature is reached, and switches on again after temperature drops.

The time it takes for the Split Air Conditioner to switch on and off causes the room temperature to greatly fluctuate.

With Digital Inverter, the inverter control reduces the compressor power once the desired temperature has been reached, but continues operating at a reduced state to maintain a stable room temperature with minimal fluctuations.

By putting an end to on/off compressor operation, the inverter technology also allows Digital Inverter to significantly reduce noise levels. Superior reliability has been achieved, due to the reduction of the compressor ON/OFF cycles.

When it comes to air conditioners like our Air Conditioners and their various products such as the mini air conditioners and the ductless air conditioners, one revolutionary technology which is changing the world of air conditioning and the way split air conditioners are powered is the DC Inverter Air Conditioners.
Our Air Conditioners and their DC Inverter Air Conditioners provide this benefit to consumers of air conditioner, helping them to achieve various benefits such as saving of  at least 25% of their energy costs and limiting their spending on electricity helping them to own air conditioners which are much quieter and offer a much higher levels of efficiency as their noisier counterparts.

The Definition of BTU rating and its Implications

BTU is an acronym which basically stands for ''British Thermal Unit'', by definition BTU refers to the required amount of heat energy which is needed to raise a single pound of water by a temperature of one degree Fahrenheit. The BTU measurement is the standard which is used to state the amount of energy that a fuel possesses and also the output of any device which generates heat, even air conditioners (which generate heat as a by-product) such as mini split air conditioners and ductless air conditioners.

Make the following assumption, assume that a gallon of water is 60 degrees Fahrenheit and you intend to bring it to boiling temperature at 212 degrees Fahrenheit, you will more or less require about 1,200 BTU in order to do it. Any material which is combustible or has combustible substances in it (e.g. gas in Our Air Conditioners), will have a BTU rating. Substances and compounds such as propane and charcoal have BTU ratings which can be helpful in determining various details such as the amount of fuel which is needed to carry out a particular task.

Manufacturers have various reasons why their products carry BTU ratings, in the case of things like gas grills and other elements of this nature, it helps you determine how much fuel you will be burning and this factor gives you room to assess a number of details. In the case of the mini split air conditioners and the ductless air conditioners, presence of a BTU rating also assists in determining energy efficiency as well as the potential amount of energy which will be consumed during the process.

Our Air Conditioners also come with a BTU rating as well in order to help people purchasing these air conditioners determine their efficiency in a particular space as well as various issues which concern energy consumption. They are available in 9000, 12000, 18000 and 24000 BTU. Most air conditioners whether they are mini split unit air conditioners, ductless air conditioners or otherwise, tend to have BTU ratings that attempt to maximize efficiency to save money for their users.

Understanding Split air conditioners energy efficiency by  the S.E.E.R. Rating

When split air conditioners are rated to determine their efficiency, it is usually S.E.E.R ratings which are used. S.E.E.R is an acronym for Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ration which is defined as 210/240 Performance Rating of Unitary Air-Conditioning and Air-Source Heat Pump Equipment. When considering our air conditioners, the higher the S.E.E.R rating if an air conditioner, then the higher and more energy efficient the air conditioner is. A simple and straightforward way to adjudge the energy costs of using mini split air conditioners and ductless air conditioners is to translate the SEER number directly to the energy cost whereby SEER 10 is more or less equal to 10 BTUs for every Watt-Hour of operation.  The lower the SEER rating then the less efficient the mini split air conditioning system, it's a straightforward calculation and you do not really require specifics to get grounded as far as the basics are concerned. Our air conditioners have a standard minimum SEER rating of 13, however certain units reach ratings as high as 14.5.

Q. What does the abbreviation 'HVAC' mean?

A. Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning.

Q. What certifications does an HVAC specialist need?

A. First and foremost, they require EPA refrigeration certification. There may also be state and local licenses and certifications that would vary from place to place. But EPA certification is on a Federal level and if you work with refrigerants, you MUST have this certification.  

Q. How does air conditioning work?

A. An air conditioner is a device which uses a special type of substance which readily changes from its normal gas state to a liquid one. The gas is contained in a closed circuit of pipes connected to a pump. The pump compresses the gas so hard that the pressure is great enough for it to turn into a liquid. In doing this the gas/liquid has got hot (If you try to compress a gas, it will almost always get hot - think of a bike pump when you pump up a tyre (tire), the greater the pressure in the tyre, the hotter the pump gets)Now the hot liquid travels round a set of pipes which allow the heat to escape. Next the liquid under pressure passes through a valve into a pipe where the pressure is much lower, and the liquid evaporate back into its gas state. In doing this it needs to take in heat from its surroundings, thus making the pipes colder. The gas now gets back to the pump and the whole cycle starts again. The pipes are usually arranged so that there are fans to blow air over both the hot part of the pipes and the cold part. The hot part is frequently put outside the house, and the cold part inside. This is called either a 'split pack', or a 'twin pack' depending on which country you are in There are also portable versions which have both parts in the same box, with the cold air blowing out of the front, and the hot air blowing out of a flexible hose which you put outside the room to allow the hot air to dissipate.

Q. What is a programmable thermostat?

A. A senses the room temperature and controls the HVAC system according to a schedule established by the homeowner. This type of thermostat allows different temperature settings to automatically regulate the HVAC system at different preset times.

Q. How can you safely do a pump down procedure on a home split cycle air conditioning system and what tools would you need?

A. Sorry, but a certified refrigeration tech needs to do it. It's the law the tools are going to cost you more than the service anyway, that's for sure and if you don't get the oil charge right when you re-fill, you will waste your compressor after twenty years in the biz, I have seen it all. Your smart move is to shop around for a tech who is not an idiot.

Q. What is a heat pump?

A. A heat pump is like a conventional air conditioner except it also can provide heat in winter. In the summer, the heat pump collects heat from the house and expels it outside. In the winter, the heat pump extracts heat from outside air and circulates it inside the house. The heat pump works best when the outdoor temperature is above freezing. Below that, supplementary heat often is needed. A heat pump can save 30 to 60 percent less energy to supply the same heat when compared to an electric furnace with a resistance heating element.In its cooling mode, a heat pump supplies exactly the same kind of cooling as all electric air conditioners. In its heating mode, the temperature of the air supplied by a heat pump is not as hot as the air supplied by a fossil fuel furnace, but the end result is the same:  a warm, comfortable home. Air temperature from a heat pump at room outlets normally is about 100 degrees Fahrenheit compared to about 120 to 130 degrees from a fossil fuel furnace.

Q. Why would the air conditioner be blowing hot air instead of cool air?

A. Most likely has a Freon leak, or a control problem causing heat to turn on, or if you have a heat pump the reversing valve has a problem OR Refrigerant is probably low.

Q. Where would a leak in a home AC system probably be?

A. This question is too broad. If it is a refrigerant leak it is most likely in one of the 2 coils. It could also be in the line set wherever the copper lines were joined with couplings and elbows.
It is also possible that the line set has been punctured with a nail during construction or home improvement.

Q. What is the best type of system to meet all indoor comfort needs?

A. The best system depends on many variables, including family size, house location and design, and utility cost and availability. The optimum indoor comfort system might include high efficiency central air conditioning and heating, a high efficiency air cleaner, and a central humidifier.

Q. What is the best type of system to meet all indoor comfort needs?

A. The best system depends on many variables, including family size, house location and design, and utility cost and availability. The optimum indoor comfort system might include high efficiency central air conditioning and heating, a high efficiency air cleaner, and a central humidifier.

Q. When is the best time to buy an air conditioner?

A. Like most items, in the off season. That's when contractors have more time to spend with you determining exactly the best options you would want to consider for your individual needs.

Q. If I buy a new system, what is the best kind of control unit?

A. If you want flexibility to program your temperature changes, a computerized thermostat will probably be best. Manually operated control systems allow you to select a temperature setting which your unit will maintain.

Q. How can I get a high efficiency system that will have minimum operational costs?

A. Manufacturers publish equipment efficiency ratings which are available to your contractor. ARI also publishes directories indicating various energy efficiency ratings of specific equipment.
It is important that a contractor install a unit that has just the right capacity to cool your home. Units with excess capacity will cycle on and off and work less efficiently, thus increasing your operating costs.

Q. How can a homeowner tell if a contractor's price is fair?

A. Mostly by comparing bids from several contractors and possibly checking the local Better Business Bureau to be sure the contractor has a good reputation.

Q. When do I know it''s time to replace my system?

A. When the system starts giving you more problems than seem cost effective to fix, particularly when major components such as the compressor start making unusual noises or otherwise indicating need for a service call. When faced with major repairs, consult several contractors for their recommendations. Replacing a compressor is somewhat less expensive than replacing the entire unit, but new units may give you greater efficiency and lower operating costs in the long run.

Q. If I buy a new system, what is the best kind of control unit?

A. If you want flexibility to program your temperature changes, a computerized thermostat will probably be best. Manually operated control systems allow you to select a temperature setting which your unit will maintain.

Q. How can I get a high efficiency system that will have minimum operational costs?


A. Manufacturers publish equipment efficiency ratings which are available to your contractor. ARI also publishes directories indicating various energy efficiency ratings of specific equipment.
It is important that a contractor install a unit that has just the right capacity to cool your home. Units with excess capacity will cycle on and off and work less efficiently, thus increasing your operating costs.

Q. Why is your home air conditioner blowing air but no cold air is coming out?

A. The Refrigerant may have lost its ability to cool or the Refrigerant may not be circulating due to a faulty pump, Refrigerant does not lose its ability to cool. There is either insufficient Refrigerant for the size of the system indicating a leak, or the pump is wearing to the point where it can no longer provide sufficient compression of the gas. In either case, a trained tech is required and should be able to provide an immediate diagnosis.

Q. What should you do if the 2-ton split ductless AC you just installed is not reaching its set temperature and ice is forming on the outside condenser and copper tubing?

A. Sounds like they gave you a heat pump (instead of an ac) with a warranty issue OR Warranty issue. Sounds like you are low on refrigerant.

Q. Why does your air conditioner freeze up?

A. There are a couple of things that cause your AC to freeze up.
If your indoor coil is icing up you:
1. Have a dirty filter 2. Have a system low on refrigerant 3. You have a blower that is not providing enough air across the coil

Q. What's wrong with your AC if the tubes are freezing and the air is not as cold?

A. It is freezing up. We find this problem occurs particularly when it cools off somewhat outside. Turn your a/c temperature up and your fan speed to high. This helps to keep it from freezing. More than likely you are low on refrigerant. Have you had the pressures checked? Also check you filter and ensure it is not dirty.

Q. If my air conditioner is no longer cooling properly, what is the most likely problem?


A. It could be as simple as replacing a fuse, resetting a circuit breaker or checking to see if the thermostat is set properly. If an electrical problem isn't the cause, the refrigerant may be low if the system still runs but does not cool properly. This can be corrected by having an EPA certified technician add necessary refrigerant. Most likely, if the problem involves any major part, such as the compressor, you would hear strange noises similar to those of any mechanical equipment not running correctly, or the unit might not run at all. <<>>

Q. If I'm buying a house, how can I make sure that the air conditioning system is in good working order?

A. Just turn on the system and listen for unusual sounds while feeling how cool the air is and how strong the air flow is from the vents.  Don't just listen inside the house   go outside and listen to the condensing unit, too.   This personal inspection is a good indicator, but like buying a car, the best way is to then hire an expert   a contractor   to come out and inspect the system. It won't cost much, and it could save you lots of money in unanticipated repairs.

Q. Can homeowners repair their own air conditioners?

A. In most cases, definitely not. Cooling systems today are more complicated to service and usually require expert attention in order to comply with federal regulations, such as the Clean Air Act which prohibits releasing refrigerants into the atmosphere.  An EPA certified air conditioning contractor or service technician should be called at the first sign of trouble.

Q. How often should I change the air filter in my system ?

A. Check it at least every month during peak use, and replace it when it looks dirty enough to significantly impair the air flow through it.  Some filters, such as media filters or electronic air cleaners, are washable; others are disposable and must be replaced.

Q. In hot weather, should I turn my thermostat up when I leave for work in the morning?

A. If your house is going to be empty for more than about four hours, it's a good idea to turn your thermostat up to about 82 degrees or so instead of the 78 usually recommended. Keep the house closed to minimize heat build up. When you come home, don't set the thermostat any lower than the temperature you actually want your air conditioning system wouldn't cool any faster and might easily waste money by cooling your home more than needed.

Q. What is General Energy use in Any A/C?

A. It should be noted that in a thermodynamically closed system, any energy input into the system that is being maintained at a set temperature (which is a standard mode of operation for modern air conditioners) requires that the energy removal rate from the air conditioner increase. This increase has the effect that for each unit of energy input into the system (say to power a light bulb in the closed system) requires the air conditioner to remove that energy. In order to do that the air conditioner must increase its consumption by the inverse of its efficiency times the input unit of energy. As an example presume that inside the closed system a 100 watt light bulb is activated, and the air conditioner has an efficiency of 200%. The air conditioners energy consumption will increase by 50 watts to compensate for this, thus making the 100 W light bulbs utilize a total of 150 W of energy.

Q. What is 'SEER' ?

A. Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER)- A measure of seasonal or annual efficiency of a central air conditioner or air conditioning heat pump. It takes into account the variations in temperature that can occur within a season and is the average number of Btu of cooling delivered for every watt-hour of electricity used by the heat pump over a cooling season.

Q. Is using ceiling fans and the air conditioner at the same time cost efficient or a waste of energy?

A. Ceiling fans are definitely not a waste of energy.
Ceiling fans use very little electricity. Use them to circulate air in the house, to make the house feel cooler. By doing this, the thermostat setting for your air conditioner can be raised to 85 F, and still maintain the same comfort as the lower setting.

Q. How can I determine the SEER of my present equipment?

A. There are three main ways to determine the SEER of equipment: (1) find the model numbers of your present equipment (the outdoor condenser/compressor unit and the indoor evaporator coil unit) and check them with local contractors who handle your brand; (2) estimate the SEER based on the average SEER units produced approximately when your system was installed; or (3) check the energy efficiency label on your outdoor condenser/compressor unit if you have equipment produced after late 1988.

In the first method, contractors can then consult manufacturer data or the ARI unitary equipment certification directory which lists all models of equipment by manufacturers that certify their equipment SEER ratings.  In the second method, for air conditioners and heat pumps produced in 1981, the first year SEER criteria was used, the average ratings were 7.78 and 7.51 respectively. By 1987, SEERs reached 8.97 and 8.93 respectively.

By 1994, ratings increased to 10.61 for air conditioners and 10.94 for heat pumps. In the third method, residential central air conditioners and heat pumps covered under Department of Energy (DOE) test procedures and manufactured on and after June 7, 1988, are required to have labels containing energy efficiency information.  For each system, the label will be on the outdoor condenser/compressor unit, and will reflect the SEER achieved by matching the outdoor unit and the indoor evaporator coil unit.

Q. How can I find the savings of higher SEER equipment compared to lower SEER equipment?

A. You'll need to talk with a local contractor to verify what size cooling equipment you now have and what you actually need, then determine the normal cooling load hours for your area, and find your electric rate cost. When cooling, heat pump performance is measured in seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER). When heating, it is measured in coefficient of performance (COP) or heating seasonal performance factor (HSPF). In all measurements, the higher the rating the more efficient the systemThe formula is as follows:
Capacity (Btuh)   Cooling Load Hours--------------- X ------------------  X Electric Rate = Annual Operating Cost    SEER                 1000For example, if a home requires a unit with a capacity of 36,000 British thermal units per hour (Btuh), is located where the cooling load is 1500 hours and the electric rate is 8 cents per kilowatt hour, here is the calculation for a system with a SEER of 10:      36,000 x 1500     ------ X ---- X .08 = $432 per year       10     1000The same calculation with a SEER of 12 reveals an annual operating cost of $360 or $72 less per season 17 percent savings..

Q. What percentage of my utility bill is caused by air conditioning?

A. It can be surprisingly small on an annual basis, but it depends on how much you use your air conditioning, how efficient your equipment is, and how much you conserve energy by actions ranging from insulating your home to keeping doors and windows closed when the system in operating. You local electric company is the best source for specifics in your area.

Q. How can I get a high efficiency system that will have minimum operational costs?

A. Manufacturers publish equipment efficiency ratings which are available to your contractor. ARI also publishes directories indicating various energy efficiency ratings of specific equipment.
It is important that a contractor install a unit that has just the right capacity to cool your home. Units with excess capacity will cycle on and off and work less efficiently, thus increasing your operating costs.

Q. Are air conditioners and heat pumps efficiency rated?

A. Yes. Central systems are rated by the seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER). Many older systems now in use have SEERs of 6 or below.
By 1994, the average SEER for all units shipped by manufacturers in the U.S. improved to 10.61 for central air conditioners and 10.94 for central heat pumps. The higher the rating, the more efficient the system.